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New York Cast Iron Paddlewheeler Boat – Wilkins

New York Cast Iron Paddlewheeler Boat Wilkins

Our cast iron Wilkins paddlewheel has been throughly reviewed and is authentic.  It has rivets on the smoke stack as well as hull locations.  There is a crack at the aft hull top where a rivet was and corrosion is very old.  Paintwork is chipped and the front wheel is missing from play.

Despite these issues, it is an authentic and a survivor.  Frankly the issues help identify it as a turn of the century toy.   It shouldn’t be confused with the later recast reproductions.  Also, this is cast iron by Wilkins and many repos are aluminum.

Regardless, it is interesting to see all the hand painted accents.  Yellow was used on the top deck.  White throughout.  Red and green accents are on high spots.  Black lettering was hand painted.  Note the font and better quality of “New York” painted on each paddle.

Wilkins Toy Co. Keene, New Hampshire
1890 – 1919 (see also Kingsbury)
Founder: James S. Wilkins
Specialty: One of the earliest manufacturers to produce toy automobiles, circa 1895. Another Keene, New Hampshire, firm, headed by Henry T. Kingsbury, bought out Wilkins that same year, but the toy line carried the Wilkins name and trademark until 1919.

Post Wilkins history:

Kingsbury Mfg. Co. (also see Wilkins Toy Co.) Keene, New Hampshire
1919 – 1942
Wilkins Toy Co.
Founder: Harry T. Kingsbury
Specialty: In 1895 Harry T. Kingsbury bought Wilkins and combined it with the Clipper Machine Works, which specialized in farm equipment. In the early 1900s, toy automobiles were introduced to the company line.

 

Description

New York Cast Iron Paddlewheeler Boat Wilkins

Our cast iron Wilkins paddlewheel has been throughly reviewed and is authentic.  It has rivets on the smoke stack as well as hull locations.  There is a crack at the aft hull top where a rivet was and corrosion is very old.  Paintwork is chipped and the front wheel is missing from play.

Despite these issues, it is an authentic and a survivor.  Frankly the issues help identify it as a turn of the century toy.   It shouldn’t be confused with the later recast reproductions.  Also, this is cast iron by Wilkins and many repos are aluminum.

Regardless, it is interesting to see all the hand painted accents.  Yellow was used on the top deck.  White throughout.  Red and green accents are on high spots.  Black lettering was hand painted.  Note the font and better quality of “New York” painted on each paddle.

Wilkins Toy Co. Keene, New Hampshire
1890 – 1919 (see also Kingsbury)
Founder: James S. Wilkins
Specialty: One of the earliest manufacturers to produce toy automobiles, circa 1895. Another Keene, New Hampshire, firm, headed by Henry T. Kingsbury, bought out Wilkins that same year, but the toy line carried the Wilkins name and trademark until 1919.

 

Post Wilkins history:

Kingsbury Mfg. Co. (also see Wilkins Toy Co.) Keene, New Hampshire
1919 – 1942
Wilkins Toy Co.
Founder: Harry T. Kingsbury
Specialty: In 1895 Harry T. Kingsbury bought Wilkins and combined it with the Clipper Machine Works, which specialized in farm equipment. In the early 1900s, toy automobiles were introduced to the company line.